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Emergency Travel Warning for Nigeria

Emergency Travel Warning for Nigeria Featured Image

The U.S. Embassy and Consulate General issue the following emergency message for U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Nigeria.

International and domestic air travel remain disrupted on day three of a nationwide strike protesting the Nigerian government’s decision to end its subsidy on gasoline. While the international airports in both Abuja and Lagos remain open, most airlines have cancelled incoming and departing flights. All domestic airports nationwide have closed, with all domestic flights grounded. Given the fluid situation, we advise U.S. citizens to confirm flight schedules directly with airlines before they travel to the airport.

Travelers between the airports serving Abuja and Lagos and their respective city centers periodically experience blockages. We advise U.S. citizens to avoid or minimize road travel for the duration of the strike. Demonstrations continue in various cities in Nigeria. Large demonstrations may occur Thursday, January 12, on Victoria and Ikoyi Islands in Lagos and in the center of Abuja. Authorities have established curfews of varying lengths in the cities of Kaduna (Kaduna State), Kano (Kano State), Oyo (Oyo State), Potiskum (Yobe State), Yola (Adamawa State), and Gusau (Zamfara state).

Even though organizers pledged to stage peaceful strikes and protests, the potential exists for some events to become confrontational and escalate suddenly into violence. We therefore urge U.S. citizens to avoid areas of such protests and maintain low profiles. U.S. citizens should monitor news reports regarding the location of demonstrations. During the general strike, U.S. citizens should expect continued closure of shops, gas stations, and banks.

If you have purchased the Roundtrip or Trip Protector travel insurance, then please contact the 24 hour worldwide assistance telephone numbers on your ID cards for travel delay benefits.

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